Official UK Outlet 100% Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li UK Online Store

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Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li
Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li

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  • Stainless steel grinding jar with push-fit lid for use with low-demand application under rough conditions, including frozen yeast cells
  • For use with MM 200 mixer mill (sold separately)
  • Approximate hardness of 48 to 52 HRC
  • Material analysis (in percent): Fe (82.925), Cr (14.5), Mn (1), Si (1), C (0.5), P (0.045), S (0.03)
  • 1.5mL capacity
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Product description

Retsch manufactures milling and sieving instruments for industrial and scientific use. The company, founded in 1915, is headquartered in Haan, Germany.

The problem

The impacts of climate change are being felt around the world, and rural communities in developing countries are bearing the brunt.

Farmers are facing increasingly severe climate impacts like drought, increased soil salinity, and new insect pest and disease threats. Farmers - in particular female farmers - are among the most vulnerable to the impacts as they often lack the resources and skills to respond to these challenges.

With the right support, countries and farmers most vulnerable to climate risks can adapt to climate change, delivering improved food security and economic development.

The problem

The impacts of climate change are being felt around the world, and rural communities in developing countries are bearing the brunt.

Farmers are facing increasingly severe climate impacts like drought, increased soil salinity, and new insect pest and disease threats. Farmers - in particular female farmers - are among the most vulnerable to the impacts as they often lack the resources to respond to these challenges.

With the right support, countries and farmers most vulnerable to climate risks can adapt to climate change, delivering improved food security and economic development.

Our vision

For smallholder farmers to have increased incomes and grow safer, higher quality food through climate-resilient approaches to crop production.

How we will do it

PlantwisePlus will support countries in identifying key crops where quality can be improved to:

Official UK Outlet 100% Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li UK Online Store

Official UK Outlet 100% Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li UK Online Store

Official UK Outlet 100% Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li UK Online Store aiding us in our endeavour is the relationship we have with our customers. to enhance this we encourage them to give us their views and engage in a dialogue with us at our website, also serves as a channel for us to highlight new arrivals and promotions. Kefir Starter Cultures - Pack of Freeze-Dried Culture Sachets Fo Retsch 02.462.0057 Stainless Steel Grinding Jar with Push-fit Li One sachet is enough to make 1 litre of thick creamy, extra mild in taste milk kefir and recultured many times Can be set at room temperature. No need of specific appliances, yogurt makers etc. Contains blend of live active bacteria like Lactococcus lactis ssp.cremoris, Lactococcus lactis ssp. Lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. Lactis biovar diacetylactis, S. thermophilus, Lactobacillus kefir, Lactobacillus parakefir, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis. Pure bacterial blend of cultures made in laboratory environment away from additives, maltodextrin, gluten and GMO. Optimises digestion, bowel movements and intestinal flora Extra mild in taste, suitable for healthy and delicious smoothies Product Description KEFIR STARTER CULTURES - FREEZE-DRIED CULTURES FOR HOMEMADE MILD MILK KEFIR Mild Milk Kefir Starter - 1 sachet Use with all kind of Yoghurt Making Devices for a thick texture or with no device for a more Liquid texture International step-by-step directions Yogurt App Customer coaching YouTube animated video explainers Support forum Pure bacterial blend of cultures made in laboratory environment, away from additives, maltodextrin, gluten and GMO Suitable for vegetarians and SCD diet KEFIR STARTER CULTURES - FREEZE-DRIED CULTURES FOR HOMEMADE MILD MILK KEFIR For Home Crafted Kefir with Very Mild Taste and Creamy Texture Kefir is a dairy food/drink made authentically by fermentation of Whole Dairy Milk which is triggered by Lactic bacteria and Yeast, unlike Yogurt which fermentation is triggered by Lactic Bacteria only. The activation starts after added to milk for the first time, and it has not interacted with any environmental microorganisms, the resulting kefir is very much suitable for anyone and after a few recultivations it will start producing small grains which will grow gradually but slow. It works best with Whole Dairy Milk and Soy Milk with no preservatives and additives. 1 sachet make 1L (approx 1 US quart ) of Yogurt Then Every single spoon from the first batch can be recultured many times Convenient Packages for Everyone Kefir Starter Cultures - Pack of 3 Freeze-dried Culture Sachets for Mild Milk Kefir Ideal for Beginners and Testing Kefir Starter Cultures - Pack of 5 Freeze-dried Culture Sachets for Mild Milk Kefir Great for Beginners and Large Batches Kefir Starter Cultures - Pack of 12 Freeze-dried Culture Sachets for Mild Milk Kefir Only for addicted to Kefir and healthy eating. Do not take if not... Yearly supply(if you reculture 4 times per month) How to Make Kefir at Home with a Freeze-Dried Starter Step-by Step Tutorial 1. Please take 1L (1 US liquid quart) of whole (full fat milk) dairy milk with no preservatives. 2. Boil or heat the milk and then cool it down to 40-45 degrees Celsius(104F-113F) should be slightly warm when touch the sides of the container. 3. Add the starter and stir well. Leave for 15-30 min. 4. Transfer the mixture in sterilised jars and incubate: 4.1. Using a yogurtmaker - at 40-45 degrees Celsius (104F-113F) with no stirring or shaking for 12-16 hours or a bit more (occasionally 24 hours) if incubate the mix at lower temperature or until set. The kefir set with yogurt-maker will have a yogurt-like texture with specific flavour and taste. 4.2. Room Temperature Incubation – wrap the container with thick towel and place at hot spot for 24-48 hours (occasionally a bit more) if the temperature is lower than needed. The kefir set at room temperature will be liquid with specific flavour and taste. 5. Refrigerate for about 3-6 hours. 6. Once the kefir is ready you can reculture again with 3 spoons of ready yogurt and milk as this time incubate for about 3-6 hours, so keep an eye on it. If you prefer more liquid texture please shake or stir very well before or after the refrigeration Yogurt Starter Cultures - Pack of 12 Freeze-dried Sachets for Acidophilus Yogurt Yogurt Starter Cultures - Freeze-Dried Cultures for Bifido Yogurt Yogurt Starter Cultures - Freeze-Dried Starter for Authentic Bulgarian Yogurt Yogurt Starter Cultures - Freeze-Dried cultures for Pure Acidophilus Yogurt Vegan Starter Cultures for Homemade BIO Yogurt Kefir Starter Culture For homemade Milk Kefir Texture(depends on the milk) Thick Thick Thick Creamy Creamy Creamy or Thick all depneds on the temperature of incubation Taste 1st batch Mild/Slightly Sour Mild Mild/Slightly Sour Mild Mild Mild Taste consequent batch Slightly Sour Mild Slightly Sour Mild Mild Mild Blend ''Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus'', ''Streptococcus thermophilus'', '' Lactobacillus acidophilus'' ''Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus'', ''Streptococcus thermophilus'',Bifidobacteria ''Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus'' and ''Streptococcus thermophilus'' '' Lactobacillus acidophilus'' ''Lactobacilus Gasseri'' and ''Lactobacilus Rhamnosus'', ''Bifidus infantis'', ''Bifidus adolescentis'' and many more. Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis ssp.lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis biovar diacetylactis, S. Thermophilus, Lactobacillus Bulgaricus, Lactobacillus kefir, Lactobacillus parakefir, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces.. Enjoy Do you know... The main difference between kefir and yogurt is in their microbiological composition as the yogurt contains lactic bacteria only (especially in combination of Lactobacillus Bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus).Unlike Yogurt The Milk Kefir contains lactobacteria and also yeast. Traditionally the Milk Kefir is fermented at room temperature and the results is slightly sour and sometimes carbonated due to the yeast presented in it. During fermentation, changes in the composition of ingredients occur. Lactose, the sugar present in milk, is broken down mostly to lactic acid (25%) by the lactic bacteria, which results in acidification of the product. The slow-acting yeasts, late in the fermentation process, process the sugar (lactose) and add a bubbly appearance and carbonated taste. Most modern processes as well lyophilised(freeze-dried) starters, which use shorter fermentation times, result in less bubbly texture. The actual milk fermentation can be initiated by 2 types of Kefir: 1. Kefir starter – lyophilised(freeze-dried) substance which Is a mix of sugar, lactic bacteria and yeast. It is a very pure and laboratory made (and thus precisely composed) starter which contains predominantly lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Due to the fact that microbiological activity starts after added to milk for the first time, and it has not interacted with any substances yet as well environmental microorganisms, the resulting kefir is very much suitable for anyone as it does not deliver side effects. However, after a few recultivations it will start producing small grains which will grow gradually but slow. To Reculture you just need to take a few spoons from the first batch and add to the milk. No straining is required as anyway the grains would be very small. 2. Kefir grains – a fully matured and natural starter, made up from lactic acid bacteria and yeasts immobilized in a medium of proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides. The medium is formed by microbial activity and resemble small cauliflower-like grains, with colour ranging from white to creamy yellow. A complex and highly variable community can be found in these grains, which can include lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, and yeasts. While some microbes predominate, Lactobacillus species are always present. The microorganisms can vary between batches of kefir due to factors such as the kefir grains rising out of the milk while fermenting or curds forming around the grains, as well as temperature, time for inoculation and environmental factors as the surrounding microorganisms and level of the interaction with them. You can make kefir with raw or pasteurized milk. It's easier than yogurt as the temperature can be lower and the temperature variations not that strict. Simply mix your culture (either grains or powder) with 1L of milk, cover your jar, and then incubate at room temperature for 24 to 48 hours (adjusting up or down depending on the season of the year, temperature of your house, etc.). In case that you use yogurtmaker and freeze-dried kefir starter and whole milk the consistency might be more yogurt-like than liquid as it will be if you cultivate at room temperature. Grocery Gourmet Food => Dairy, Cheese Eggs => Yogurt Outlet Prices Online I want to start by saying that I read all of the reviews prior to buying and using these particular freeze dried cultures. I've made kefir from live cultures before, but had never tried freeze dried. I'm still on the cultures from the first packet and have been logging everything so I can share.The number one most important thing I read from the instructions that came with the packets is that you need to use the freshest, full fat milk, with no preservatives, that you can get. (Please read the instructions: It only takes 2 minutes.) When I read how a lot of your kefir failed because you were using skim milk, 1%, 2% or old milk, it doesn't surprise me. Kefir is an organism that needs fuel. When you use processed milk of any kind, you've already sabotaged your kefir effort.The number two most important thing is to be using non-metal containers and utensils for scalding and stirring your milk (pasteurizing) to kill any germs or microbes that it may have picked up during the factory process. To me, this means glass. I buy my whole milk in glass bottles. I don't like plastic because it can harbor germs and offload chemicals back into the food. This means good spoons that aren't metal.The number three most important thing is to consider your heat source. My kefir has been coming out strong and firm because I have a good heat source, I don't peak at it during the culturing process, and I'm using good, full fat milk. The heat source doesn't have to be a yogurt maker. It can be cultured in a cooling oven after baking; a toaster oven (older models) set at 80°F to 90°F, or with a heating pad set at high for the first go round (mine shuts off after 2 hours) and then graduating to medium, then to low.I'm on my 4th culture with the first packet out of the five packet set. Each packet is good for culturing 5 gallons of whole milk. I want to try the next with goat milk and sheep milk.The first picture is the glass bowl I use for heating the milk and for culturing my kefir. I heat (directions says to boil) mine to the requisite 190°F, hold it at that temperature for 10 minutes, then cool it down to 110°F. I do stir it with a ceramic spoon while it's cooling and also remove the skin and feed it to Miss Pepper.The second picture is my culturing setup using the electric heating pad. I place a plate on the top of the bowl to cover, then place a doubled towel on top of that to retain the heat. This is my winter setup as it's kind of chilly in our kitchen when I'm not cooking or baking.The last picture is the perfect kefir.Have questions? Please read the instructions before asking me. Thank you.This is the first time I have tried making Kefir of any type. I didn't realize there are 2 different kinds of milk kefir; freeze-dried powder that is essentially a one-time use that doesn't require straining the SCOBYs out, and the type with "grains" (SCOBYs) that continue to grow and require ongoing maintenance. This one is the powdered kind, which can be used to make more than one batch if you wish, by taking a few spoonfuls (before adding any kind of flavoring to it) and mixing it in fresh milk then fermenting it. I have always loved yogurt and never thought twice about eating it, even though I know it is made with bacteria; but it initially took me awhile to get over the "ick factor" with the milk kefir before I could force myself to try it. It is actually quite good, especially when adding some stevia powder as sweetener, ground cinnamon, and vanilla extract. I have only been able to make 3 batches from one packet so far, but actually look forward to having a large cup of milk kefir each day now. It has good flavor, even when only adding some stevia.This makes a nice kefir. I have used whole milk and 2% milk and both have worked well. I do water kefir grains and just didn't want to deal with milk kefir grains too. This has been a great alternative though I know the amount of probiotics is much less than with kefir grains. There are just so many things one can ferment in one's kitchen at a time!I have used it also to make several batches. Just recently had froze some kefir I made and used as starter. I froze it in cubes which held 2 tablespoons per cube. Used 2-3 cubes (melted at room temp) per quart of milk and turned out great. A little packet can go a long way doing it this way. Am very pleased so far.These cultures have worked great so far. I have only needed to use one packet, since you can save some of the end product to start your next batch. Kudos to the manufacturer for also being clear in their instructions that you don't need to use a new sachet each time. As expected with any freeze dried culture, the second generation/use and on were more aggressive than the first use since they had been freeze dried but more than happy with how aggressive the cultures were right from the sachet. Very happy to see a nice mix of cultures instead of predominantly a single strain. This culture works very well, I consistenly get good quality kefir in every batch. After using the culture powder as instructed for the first batch, I bring milk to a boil briefly to kill any competing bacteria, cool to about 90F, add about 1/4 cup of kefir from the previous batch, then let it sit in a relatively warm place, covered by a paper coffee fiter secured with a rubber band, for 3-6 hours (or overnight). The resulting kefir is thick, creamy and delicious. I have been using this method for about 6 months with great results. Truly a "best buy!" I waited awhile to respond till more information could be given. The kefir from theses packets is great. I used it to make kefir with organic goat's milk and made a second jar as soon as the first was cultured. The flavor of the second jar was much better just like the instructions indicated. I also added some of the already made kefir to some organic cream. It turned out awesome. It was thick like cream cheese; use it on my bagels. So all the above from one packet of culture. This is the best success I've ever had making kefir. Great!!!This is very good. I'm still working on my first packet and the quality has been the same as the first time. It is thick with no separation into whey, and the taste is milder than I usually get. 1/20: I have finally finished the FIRST packet and it has made 12 qts. I'm so happy with this cuture!

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